Abstract

Abstract:

Discussions of "silent cinema" have generally focused on films made during the silent era (1894–1929). Even after the spread of synchronized sound, however, several experimental filmmakers created films without soundtracks, purely visual experiences that challenged cinema's status as a multisensory medium. This article gives close attention to Stan Brakhage's 1959 film Window Water Baby Moving as a way of outlining some of the effects of cinematic silence, such as aesthetic ambiguity and a heightened awareness of cinema's visual rhythms.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2578-4919
Print ISSN
2578-4900
Pages
pp. 71-90
Launched on MUSE
2019-02-16
Open Access
No
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