Abstract

Abstract:

A thriving black-market economy of scam scholarly publishing, typically referred to as 'predatory publishing,' threatens the quality of scientific literature globally. The scammers publish research with minimal or no peer review and are motivated by article processing charges and not the advancement of scholarship. Authors involved in this scam are either duped or willingly taking advantage of the low rejection rates and quick publication process. Geographic analysis of the origin of predatory journal articles indicates that they predominantly come from developing countries. Consequently, most universities in developing countries operate blacklists of deceptive journals to deter faculty from submitting to predatory publishers. The present article discusses blacklisting and, conversely, whitelisting of legitimate journals as options of deterrence. Specifically, the article provides a critical evaluation of the two approaches by explaining how they work and comparing their pros and cons to inform a decision about which is the better deterrent.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1710-1166
Print ISSN
1198-9742
Pages
pp. 83-95
Launched on MUSE
2019-02-09
Open Access
No
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