Abstract

Abstract:

In this article we analyze the impacts of a hierarchical administrative tradition on new governance in contemporary South Korea, focusing on ground-level practices of the local network governance in supporting settlements of North Korean refugees. By employing an interpretive approach that seeks to decenter governance in terms of diverse and contingent actions of policy actors against the background of distinct traditions, the study attempts to explain ways in which network governance unfolds in everyday life. Despite the institutional transition from "government to (new) governance," a deeply rooted hierarchical tradition is entangled with relatively new democratic tradition, causing unintended policy outcomes at the ground level in generating confusion and resistance among frontline policy actors. As a result, new governance can be an empty rallying cry unless policymakers and practitioners take the meaning of bottom-up seriously.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2288-2871
Print ISSN
0258-9184
Pages
pp. 69-93
Launched on MUSE
2019-02-07
Open Access
No
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