Abstract

Abstract:

This article examines the function and dynamic of the domestic spaces described in two of Emile Zola’s Rougon-Macquart novels as panoptic devices whose function it is to suppress not only the domestically bound female but the male as well. The misuse of physical spaces that provide the settings of La Curée and Nana highlights the loss of patriarchal control as the physical spaces fail to perform their intended functions. By reading architectural intent as an extension of the will and law of the father, the subsequent betrayals of class, family, and assumed control are arguably failures of the architecture and, by extension, failures of social practice reliant upon containment and surveillance.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2162-6294
Print ISSN
0742-5562
Pages
pp. 127-148
Launched on MUSE
2019-02-01
Open Access
No
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