Abstract

Abstract:

This article argues that rethinking 1960s’ and ’70s’ black nationalist political, cultural and artistic work as black communications and as a Black Communications Movement offers a comprehensive view of black nationalist activity. Attention to communication aids our understanding of how relationship-making among black people was a primary objective of nationalists as they aimed to shape black identity and a black nation. To theorize black communications, I examine black nationalist activity in the San Francisco Bay Area in the spring of 1967, an extraordinary moment of intersection between the Black Panther Party and the Amiri Baraka-led Black Communications Project.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1945-6182
Print ISSN
1062-4783
Pages
pp. 305-327
Launched on MUSE
2019-01-26
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.