Abstract

Abstract:

From a rhetorical perspective, the article argues that, for Paul, the figure of Adam serves as both a paradeigma (in a positive sense) and a contrarium (in a negative "epideictic" sense). This rhetorical technique occurs not only in Romans 5:12–14, but also in Paul's "Christ Hymn" in Philippians 2:6–11. In metaphorical terms, Adam as contrarium is depicted as the "old" humankind, the pre-converted "sinner" who lives "according to the flesh" (κατὰ σάρκα), and Adam as paradeigma is depicted as the "new" humankind, the regenerated "righteous" one who lives "according to the spirit" (κατὰ πνεῦμα). The oxymoron that the paradeigma-contrarium rhetorical technique refers to the same person is explained in this article in terms of Paul's emphasis on a spirituality of "transcendence in everydayness."

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Additional Information

ISSN
2518-4628
Print ISSN
0254-8356
Pages
pp. 359-375
Launched on MUSE
2019-01-29
Open Access
No
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