Abstract

abstract:

There are two rival models on how to interpret causal chains in Kant. Traditional event-event models take it that events are causes of events, which are in turn causes of other events. Watkins’s causal powers interpretation, on the contrary, has it that substances have unchangeable grounds, and the series of events is only a series within the effect. By comparing Kant to Crusius, I argue that, to some extent, both approaches can be combined. For the powers of substances are made active by other powers, but, at the same time, powers belong to the nature of a substance and are unchangeable. Moreover, non-causal properties that resemble Crusian existential grounds contribute to the effect as well. Finally, I give an account of the mereology of events by drawing on Kant’s resolution of the Second Antinomy.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1538-4586
Print ISSN
0022-5053
Pages
pp. 107-128
Launched on MUSE
2019-01-24
Open Access
No
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