Abstract

ABSTRACT:

This article reads Ngũgĩ wa Thiong'o's Wizard of the Crow as both a dictator-novel and a critical use of the genre to analyze the larger-scale global political transformations (so-called "transitions") that followed the end of the Cold War. Beyond its critique of dictators and dictatorship on the African continent, Wizard of the Crow turns attention to nascent networks of opposition to neoliberalism and neoliberal globalization. This constitutes the emergent Global South consciousness of Ngũgĩ's dictator-novel, which requires a reexamination of the contours of the genre in and for the twenty-first century.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2044
Print ISSN
0034-5210
Pages
pp. 223-240
Launched on MUSE
2019-01-10
Open Access
No
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