Abstract

Abstract:

The idea that China’s rise, and more specifically its increased material capabilities, are about to produce a power shift in East Asia raises the question whether the Chinese government’s ability to produce effects through discursive power has also increased. The government’s use of discourses about China’s war against Japan is a conspicuous example of attempts to exercise discursive power. Has China’s ability to use the past for political purposes increased as its material capabilities have grown ? To answer this question, I theorize on the use of discourses about the past on three levels—domestic, bilateral, and international. My analysis demonstrates that notwithstanding its increased material capabilities, the Chinese government’s discursive power has actually decreased.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2288-2871
Print ISSN
0258-9184
Pages
pp. 411-433
Launched on MUSE
2019-01-22
Open Access
No
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