Abstract

Abstract:

This essay examines representations of women's relationships to technical objects as a negotiation of ownership and control in Marie von Ebner-Eschenbach's Lotti, die Uhrmacherin (1880; Lotti, the watchmaker) and "Ein Original" (1898; "One of a Kind," 2001). I consider how the protagonists and objects in these two stories interact with, transform, and destabilize each other. Their engagement speaks to underlying issues of women's objectification in late-nineteenth-century society. Ultimately, both female protagonists, in struggling through their social objectification and relationship to everyday objects, communicate a frustration with gender-based social injustice. I apply object-oriented feminism to my examination of the relationships between objects and female protagonists in this literature in order to demonstrate how hierarchical power structures and the social circumscription of women's roles are negotiated in the object world through the industrial, patriarchal culture of the late nineteenth century.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2578-5192
Print ISSN
2578-5206
Pages
pp. 49-74
Launched on MUSE
2019-01-04
Open Access
No
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