Abstract

Abstract:

Critics have often understood Virginia Woolf's A Room of One's Own (1929) as an anti-patriarchy essay, and the limited understanding of that approach positions the work at one end of a dichotomous relationship. My essay argues that the purpose of her persuasive work is to transcend binary oppositions in her dialectical argumentation rather than find a home within the room. I use examples from Woolf's exploration of interior and exterior spaces in A Room of One's Own and Mrs. Dalloway, as well as critical approaches to understanding the concept of "room" as simultaneously an abstract and physical space—and much more.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1464
Print ISSN
0022-281X
Pages
pp. 19-31
Launched on MUSE
2019-01-03
Open Access
No
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