Abstract

Abstract:

This article examines how Horace applies an erotic, specifically pederastic, model to amicitia in Epistles 1, focusing on those poems that sexualize the patron/client relationship and the production of poetry: 1.1, 1.17, 1.18, 1.19, and 1.20. I argue that Horace reassesses what constitutes virtus, "manliness," in Augustan Rome. Whereas Horace opens the collection by insisting on an uncompromisingly penetrative formulation of masculinity, the last poems show him moderating this stance, opening up a space between domination and submission through which Roman viri can maintain their masculine prerogatives while navigating complexly hierarchical patronal and imperial structures.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3168
Print ISSN
0002-9475
Pages
pp. 675-709
Launched on MUSE
2018-12-28
Open Access
No
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