Abstract

Abstract:

Two patterns of alternation affect the phonemes /a/ and /o/ in Subanon, an underdocumented Austronesian language spoken in the southern Philippines. Under suffixation, /a/ becomes /o/ in the antepenult (Pattern 1), and /o/ becomes /a/ in the penult preceding a palatal glide (Pattern 2). Pattern 1 has no apparent synchronic motivation, but comparative evidence shows that Proto-Subanen *a weakened to schwa when placed in pretonic position through suffixation, and that schwa from any source then became Subanon /o/. Pattern 2 is similar to a Subanon process called "partial vowel harmony assimilation," as well as to the alternation of final -əy/-əw with penultimate -ay/-aw in Western Bukidnon Manobo. However, in both cases, these processes turn out to be unrelated. In conclusion, Pattern 2 shows no clear synchronic and diachronic motivation, and we are left with a descriptive statement without an explanation.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1527-9421
Print ISSN
0029-8115
Pages
pp. 289-302
Launched on MUSE
2018-12-12
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.