Abstract

ABSTRACT:

This essay examines Samuel Jackson Pratt’s, Emma Corbett: Or, the Miseries of Civil War (1780), a popular novel about the American Revolution that mounted an argument against the violence of the war. Pratt’s critique of the transatlantic conflict between the colonies and the mother country arises from his depiction of suffering veterans with injuries and missing limbs. In an interpolated tale that he titles “A Military Fragment,” he uses what I call a “typographical prosthetics” to represent their absent body parts. Through a creative typography that includes extended dashes and multiple asterisks, he creates an architecture of the page that visually describes the placement and displacement of limbs. He thus criticizes and remediates discourses of national conflict by making the disabled bodies of injured soldiers discernible on the page.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1935-0201
Print ISSN
0193-5380
Pages
pp. 449-469
Launched on MUSE
2018-12-07
Open Access
No
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