Abstract

Abstract:

In its relatively short existence, Black Mountain College became a pioneer of a progressive education movement that put the arts at the center of the liberal arts curriculum. Here I examine a range of reasons advanced by its advocates and show some of the difficulties that arise on the instrumental view of art as an educational asset. Drawing on the educational philosophy of John Dewey, I then develop an alternative approach to the question of art’s educational value. Instead of identifying and articulating the specific sense in which art is useful, what I call the pragmatic approach frames the value of art in terms of its unique capacity to examine and challenge the normative assumptions built into conventional judgments of the “useful.”

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Additional Information

ISSN
1543-7809
Print ISSN
0021-8510
Pages
pp. 49-68
Launched on MUSE
2018-12-05
Open Access
No
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