Abstract

Abstract:

The article juxtaposes two memoirs about Asperger's by John Elder Robison—Look Me in the Eye and Switched On—with an experimental novel by Lydia Netzer, Shine, Shine, Shine. To varying degrees, these texts challenge the disorder model of autism, attesting to the harm that autistic children suffer when people impose normative social expectations on them. The article compares Robison's memoirs, which ultimately rely on the conversion trope central to popular autism narratives, with Netzer's use of the novel to invoke and then reject the trope of conversion. In place of the conversion trope, the article invokes a theory of neurodiversity that acknowledges the ways that autistic spectrum disorders (ASD) bolster success in a world dominated by technology, and represent an evolutionary development suited to the practical and epistemological demands of the twenty-first century.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1757-6466
Print ISSN
1757-6458
Pages
pp. 423-439
Launched on MUSE
2018-11-22
Open Access
No
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