Abstract

Abstract:

Jean-Jacques Rousseau gave pride of place to the imagination in his new science of consciousness. Two of his most important literary works, Confessions and Julie, were intended to exhibit the range, complexity, and potency of this much-maligned faculty, thereby affirming its rightful place in a science of what consciousness reveals. In mining his own experience for data, Rousseau discovered that the imagination's idealization powers soothed the disturbing spontaneity of consciousness as well as his own longing for enduring attachments.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-329X
Print ISSN
0190-0013
Pages
pp. 361-375
Launched on MUSE
2018-11-15
Open Access
No
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