Abstract

Abstract:

Objective. The continued expansion of Medicaid is under debate; it is critical to evaluate the effect of obtaining Medicaid on access to preventive care.

Methods. We analyzed longitudinal data from the 2013–2014 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey and applied a difference-in-differences approach. Our treatment group included low-income, non-pregnant, non-disabled adults aged 18–64 with no insurance in 2013 who received Medicaid in 2014; the comparison group included individuals who did not have insurance in either year.

Results. Gaining Medicaid increased the likelihood of having a usual source of care, at least one office visit, annual checkup, annual cholesterol and blood pressure tests by 13 (CI: 2–24), 14 (CI: 2–27), 11 (CI: 1–21), 29 (CI: 20–39), and 13 (CI: 1–25) percentage points, respectively. Receipt of flu vaccine increased by eight (CI: –3–19) percentage points (insignificant).

Conclusions. Medicaid coverage improved use of evidence-based preventive services at a national level among uninsured, non-pregnant, low-income adults.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1548-6869
Print ISSN
1049-2089
Pages
pp. 1472-1487
Launched on MUSE
2018-11-13
Open Access
No
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