Abstract

Abstract:

Over the course of the twentieth century, Hershey became synonymous with chocolate in America. Americans saw the company's founder, Milton Hershey, as a great industrial philanthropist, and the town flourished as a tourist attraction. This article shows how Hershey chocolate became American, traces the history of the town as a destination, and explores the way Hershey's industrial and imperial past has been obfuscated in favor of a narrative grounded in the brand's place in American culture and Mr. Hershey's personal legacy. Commitment to welfare capitalism, the desire for Americans to visit the town and the factory, and the Hershey Company's intentionally folksy self-promotion worked to establish the brand as part of American popular culture.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2169-8546
Print ISSN
0031-4587
Pages
pp. 339-364
Launched on MUSE
2018-11-07
Open Access
No
Archive Status
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