Abstract

Abstract:

This essay notes the frequency with which commentators suggest that Finnegans Wake is best experienced when read aloud. The assumption seems to be that the book is not heard when read in silence. The essay turns to the science of silent reading to show that many of the most salient features of the book's soundscape are of the sort research has shown likely to elicit active subvocal rehearsal when read in silence. Having made that case, the essay considers the fact that the voice with which we read in silence is also the voice with which we think. What does it mean to have Finnegans Wake accompany us there?

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Additional Information

ISSN
1938-6036
Print ISSN
0021-4183
Pages
pp. 353-372
Launched on MUSE
2018-11-12
Open Access
No
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