Abstract

Abstract:

This article provides two new definitions in sports history: first, the sport product, which is seen as encompassing player, spectator, and associated products; and, second, sports entrepreneurship, which covers the four categories of direct income seeking, indirect income seeking, psychic income seeking, and nonprofit promotional activities. Within these categories, attention is drawn to sports entertainment and "dark" entrepreneurs, as well as the historical importance of examining entrepreneurial failure. Two typologies of sports entrepreneurs are presented, one looking at aims and objectives and the other at function. It is argued that sociocultural sports historians should not ignore economic aspects of sports provision.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
2155-8455
Print ISSN
0094-1700
Pages
pp. 183-201
Launched on MUSE
2018-11-01
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.