In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:

  • References to J.R.R. Tolkien in the Collected Works of Northrop Frye
  • Robert D. Denham, compiler

Collected Works of Northrop Frye

  • CW 1 = The Correspondence of Northrop Frye and Helen Kemp, 1932–1939. Vol. 1. Ed. Robert D. Denham. 1996.

  • CW 2 = The Correspondence of Northrop Frye and Helen Kemp, 1932–1939. Vol. 2. Ed. Robert D. Denham. 2 vols. 1996.

  • CW 3 = Northrop Frye's Student Essays, 1932–1938. Ed. Robert D. Denham. 1997.

  • CW 4 = Northrop Frye on Religion. Ed. Alvin A. Lee and Jean O'Grady. 2000.

  • CW 5 = Northrop Frye's Late Notebooks, 1982–1990: Architecture of the Spiritual World. Ed. Robert D. Denham. 2000.

  • CW 6 = Northrop Frye's Late Notebooks, 1982–1990: Architecture of the Spiritual World. Ed. Robert D. Denham. 2000.

  • CW 7 = Northrop Frye's Writings on Education. Ed. Goldwin French and Jean O'Grady. 2000.

  • CW 8 = The Diaries of Northrop Frye, 1942–1955. Ed. Robert D. Denham. 2001.

  • CW 9 = The "Third Book" Notebooks of Northrop Frye, 1964–1972: The Critical Comedy. Ed. Michael Dolzani. 2001.

  • CW 10 = Northrop Frye on Literature and Society, 1936–1989. Ed. Robert D. Denham. 2002.

  • CW 11 = Northrop Frye on Modern Culture. Ed. Jan Gorak. 2002.

  • CW 12 = Northrop Frye on Canada. Ed. Jean O'Grady and David Staines. 2003.

  • CW 13 = Northrop Frye's Notebooks and Lectures on the Bible and Other Religious Texts. Ed. Robert D. Denham. 2003.

  • CW 14 = Fearful Symmetry: A Study of William Blake. Ed. Nicholas Halmi. Intro. Ian Singer. 2004. [End Page 197]

  • CW 15 = Northrop Frye's Notebooks on Romance. Ed. Michael Dolzani. 2004.

  • CW 16 = Northrop Frye on Milton and Blake. Ed. Angela Esterhammer. 2005.

  • CW 17 = Northrop Frye's Writings on the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. Ed. Imre Salusinszky. 2005.

  • CW 18 = The Secular Scripture and Other Writings on Critical Theory. Ed. Joseph Adamson and Jean Wilson. 2006.

  • CW 19 = The Great Code: The Bible and Literature. Ed. Alvin A. Lee. 2006.

  • CW 20 = Northrop Frye's Notebooks on Renaissance Literature. Ed. Michael Dolzani. 2006.

  • CW 21 = The Educated Imagination and Other Writings on Critical Theory, 1933–1963. Ed. Germaine Warkentin. 2006.

  • CW 22 = Anatomy of Criticism: Four Essays. Ed. Robert D. Denham. 2006.

  • CW 23 = Northrop Frye's Notebooks for Anatomy of Criticism. Ed. Robert D. Denham. 2007.

  • CW 24 = Interviews with Northrop Frye. Ed. Jean O'Grady. 2008.

  • CW 25 = Northrop Frye's Fiction and Miscellaneous Writings. Ed. Robert D. Denham and Michael Dolzani. 2007.

  • CW 26 = Words with Power: Being a Second Study of "The Bible and Literature." Ed. Michael Dolzani. 2008.

  • CW 27 = The Critical Path and Other Writings on Critical Theory, 1963–1975. Ed. Eva Kushner and Jean O'Grady. 2009.

  • CW 28 = Northrop Frye's Writings on Shakespeare and the Renaissance. Ed. Gary Sherbert and Troni Grande. 2010.

  • CW 29 = Northrop Frye's Writings on Twentieth-Century Literature. Ed. Glen Robert Gill. 2009.

  • CW 30 = Index. Compiled by Jean O'Grady. 2012.

  • Frye, Northrop. Selected Letters, 1934–1991. Ed. Robert D. Denham. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, 2009.* [End Page 198]

I started attending lectures the first week. … All pretty awful. Nichol Smith wouldn't be bad for my sort of job: getting one point per lecture hammered home, but to me he's prolix & dull. Then there's Tolkien on Beowulf, dealing with a most insanely complicated problem which involves Anglo-Saxon genealogies, early Danish histories, monkish chronicles in Latin, Icelandic Eddas and Swedish folklore. Imagine my delivery at its very worst: top speed, unintelligible burble, great complexity of ideas and endless references to things unknown, mixed in with a lot of Latin and Anglo-Saxon and a lot of difficult proper names which aren't spelled, and you have Tolkien on Beowulf" (CW 2: 794–95).

The great imaginative productions of Oxford—the Anatomy of Melancholy, Alice in Wonderland, the development taking place there when I was a student around C. S. Lewis, Charles Williams and Tolkien, all suggest a slightly mad fantasy.1 This throws a light on other products of the same genius loci, such as Pater and Hopkins and such passages in Newman as: "So-and-so taught me the doctrine of Apostolic...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1547-3163
Print ISSN
1547-3155
Pages
pp. 197-219
Launched on MUSE
2018-10-27
Open Access
No
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