Abstract

Abstract:

In this essay, Rebecca Schneider develops a theory of gesture. Suggesting that gesture is always off of itself and into relation, she thinks about gesture as engaged in dynamics of call and response. Asking whether there is a time limit on responseability, Schneider turns to examples of gesture as disparate as Paleolithic negative hand stencils in France and Black Lives Matter's Hands Up protest gestures across the contemporary United States. Drawing on Dipesh Chakrabarty's "negative universalism" and Françoise Vergès reading, after Cedric Robinson, of the "racial Capitalocene," she chooses gestures that move inside, outside, and alongside human history, both in geologic time and in human time, to think the urgencies of racial violence alongside the urgencies of climate change.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1086-332X
Print ISSN
0192-2882
Pages
pp. 285-306
Launched on MUSE
2018-10-20
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.