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  • Ligeia for Solo Flute (with Glissando Headjoint)
  • Amanda Bono (bio)

Program Notes

According to Greek mythology, Ligeia was a siren: a lethal, yet beautiful creature who was known for luring nearby sailors with her captivating song. In Ligeia the flute tells the story of the siren's encounter with a young man, a sailor who got lost at sea and found himself on her island. Initially, the listener is drawn into the story by sounds of the wind and short bits of Ligeia's song; later, the listener hears the sounds of Ligeia capturing the sailor and drawing him underwater. As the piece unwinds, the music comes full circle, with Ligeia satisfied and peacefully waiting for her next victim.

Performance Notes

Much of the notation in this work was inspired by / borrowed from the second edition of The Other Flute: A Performance Manual of Contemporary Techniques by Robert Dick. In particular, the notation and corresponding techniques found in this work are as follows:


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Fig 1.

A glissando line between two pitches indicates a glissando with the headjoint. A diamond notehead above a pitch indicates the fingered note and headjoint position.

[End Page 44]


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Fig 2.

A note-head with an x indicates a key click.


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Fig 3.

A diamond notehead with sounding pitch indicates the use of a harmonic. If another harmonic is preferable to the performer, it may be used as long as the sounding pitch is the same.


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Fig 4.

When a diamond notehead is paired with the notation "pizz.," this indicates that a tongue pizzicato should be used.


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Fig 5.

A whisper tone is indicated by "ws."


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Fig 6.

Trills should be from the indicated pitch to a quarter tone or a half step above, as indicated.

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Additionally, all tempo markings are guidelines, and the performer is welcome to alter or adjust as she or he sees fit. As a result, the length of all fermatas may be adjusted as well. [End Page 46]


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[End Page 47]


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[End Page 48]


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Amanda Bono

amanda bono (b. 1987) is an active composer of works for the concert hall and stage, and her music is frequently programmed on concerts and during festivals in the United States and abroad. Recent commissions include works for VIPA, the Etchings Festival, highSCORE Music Festival, Atlantic Music Festival, New Voices @ CUA, and the Atlantic Center for the Arts. Her research interests include the music of twentieth- and twenty-first-century American women composers, and she is currently studying the works of Ellen Taaffe Zwilich. Amanda teaches music theory and music composition at Shenandoah University and James Madison University.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1553-0612
Print ISSN
1090-7505
Pages
pp. 44-49
Launched on MUSE
2018-10-17
Open Access
No
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