Abstract

abstract:

This study examines a group of late sixteenth-century embroideries by Mary Queen of Scots (1542–1587) and the English countess "Bess of Hardwick" (ca. 1527–1608). While scholars have tended to regard these textiles as status-driven proclamations of rank and power, Nicole LaBouff argues that they functioned as aids for self-instruction in natural history, the wisdom of the ancients, and the art of discourse. Recent histories have shown "information overload" to be a pervasive problem among Renaissance male intellectuals. These embroideries reveal women also struggled with it. Bess and Mary found their solution in embroidered cabinets of curiosity, needlework notebooks, and stitched mnemonic devices.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1544-399X
Print ISSN
0018-7895
Pages
pp. 315-358
Launched on MUSE
2018-09-20
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.