Abstract

Abstract:

Korean culture is a paradigmatic case for studying inter-imperial dynamics as the country’s history has been shaped by the interplay of four competing empires: China, Japan, Russia, and the US. This essay examines Korean diasporic literature and argues, first, that understanding a colonial author’s inter-imperial positionality allows texts to be reinterpreted in light of the matrix of competing forces in the inter-imperial sphere. Second, the essay looks at the distinctive Korean concept of han as a product of the nation’s inter-imperial history to consider how this aesthetic tradition continues to be a hallmark of contemporary diasporic fiction.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1080-658X
Print ISSN
0026-7724
Pages
pp. 488-511
Launched on MUSE
2018-09-12
Open Access
No
Archive Status
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