Abstract

Abstract:

This essay argues that Tess Slesinger's novel, The Unpossessed (1934), exemplifies an emerging pattern of shared conceptual work between liberal intellectuals and modernist literature in the United States.Slesinger extends a contemporary critique of possessive individualism by intellectualslike John Dewey, showing how discourses of gender, sex, and reproductive rights remain constrained by this liberal logic. Her novelthereby renders visible a long critical genealogy, linking Dewey to later feminist writers such as Judith Butler. Slesinger'streatment of abortion finally dramatizesan enduring aporia in liberal thought, a practice that cannot be coherently legislated through a right to individual self-possession.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6547
Print ISSN
0013-8304
Pages
pp. 801-822
Launched on MUSE
2018-09-03
Open Access
No
Archive Status
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.