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  • Contributors to This Issue

[Erratum]

Alain Blum, Senior Researcher at the Institut national d'études démographiques (INED, Paris) and Professor at the École des hautes études en sciences sociales (EHESS, Paris), has published, among other works, "Of Populations and Wars," in Russia's Home Front in War and Revolution, 22–22, Book 3: National Disintegration, ed. Christopher Read, Peter Waldron, and Adele Lindenmeyr (2018); and, with Emilia Koustova, "A Soviet Story—Mass Deportation, Isolation, Return," in Narratives of Exile and Identity: Soviet Deportation Memoirs from the Baltic States, ed. Violeta Davoliūtė and Tomas Balkelis (2018). With Marta Craveri and Valérie Nivelon, he edited Déportés en URSS: Récits d'européens au Goulag ([Deported to the USSR: Stories of Europeans in the Gulag], 2012, translated into Russian in 2016). His current research focuses on the forced displacement of populations and on relations between people and authorities.

Tatiana Borisova is Associate Professor of History at the National Research University—Higher School of Economics, St. Petersburg. She holds two PhD degrees, in history and law, both on various aspects of the Russian legal tradition. Her most recent articles include "Public Meaning of the Zasulich Trial 1878: Law, Politics, and Gender," Russian History 43, 3–4 (2016): 221–44; and "The Institutional Resilience of Russian Law through 1905–1917 Revolutions," Russian Law Journal 5, 4 (2017): 108–28. She co-edited, with William Simons, The Legal Dimension in Cold-War Interactions: Some Notes from the Field (2012). Currently she is working on a monograph titled "For My Enemies, the Law": A Social History of Law and Justice in Russia, 1860–1918.

Jane Burbank is Collegiate Professor and Professor of History and Russian and Slavic Studies at New York University. She is the author of Intelligentsia and Revolution: Russian Views of Bolshevism, 1917–1922 (1986); Russian Peasants Go to Court: Legal Culture in the Countryside, 1905–1917 (2004); and, with Frederick Cooper, Empires in World History: Power and the Politics of Difference (2010). She co-edited two studies of Russian empire: Imperial Russia: New Histories for the Empire, with David L. Ransel (1998); and Russian Empire: Space, People, Power, 1700–1930, with A. V. Remnev and Mark von Hagen (2007). At present she is working on imperial law and Russian sovereignty, viewed from the province of Kazan, and, with Tatiana Borisova, on a history of the Russian legal tradition.

Victoria Frede is Associate Professor of History at the University of California, Berkeley, and the author of Doubt, Atheism, and the Nineteenth-Century Russian Intelligentsia (2011).

Antony Kalashnikov is a doctoral candidate at the Faculty of History, University of Oxford. His current project is titled "Stalinist Monumental Art and Architecture and the 'Immortalization of Memory.'" His recent publications include "Strength in Diversity: Multiple Memories of the Soviet Past in the Russian Communist Party (CPRF), 1993–2004," Nationalities Papers 45, 3 (2017): 370–92; and, with Thorsten Holzhauser, "Communist Successors and Narratives of the Past: Party Factions in the German PDS and the Russian CPRF, 1990–2005," in Historical Memory of Central and East European Communism, ed. Agnieszka Mrozik and Stanislav Holubec (2018), 41–73.

Alissa Klots is Assistant Professor of History at the European University at St. Petersburg. She is currently preparing a book manuscript, The Kitchen Maid That Will Rule the State: Domestic Service in the Soviet Union. Her most recent publication is “The Kitchen Maid as Revolutionary Symbol: Paid Domestic Labour and the Emancipation of Soviet Women, 1917–1941,” in The Palgrave Handbook on Women and Gender in Twentieth-Century Russia and the Soviet Union, edited by Melanie Ilić (2018), 83–100. She is also collaborating with Maria Romashova on a project on aging under socialism.

Emilia Koustova is Associate Professor of Russian Studies and Fellow at GEO (Strasbourg University) and Associate Fellow at CERCEC (EHESS). Her many publications include "(Un)Returned from the Gulag: Life Trajectories and Integration of Postwar Special Settlers," Kritika 16, 3 (2015): 589–620; "Equalizing Misery, Differentiating Objects: The Material World of the Stalinist Exile," in Material Culture in Russia and the USSR: Things, Values, Identities, ed. G. H. Roberts (2017...

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Additional Information

ISSN
1538-5000
Print ISSN
1531-023x
Pages
pp. 686-688
Launched on MUSE
2018-08-20
Open Access
No
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