Abstract

Abstract:

This article considers the South and its influence on the protagonists in Rita Williams-Garcia's Like Sisters on the Homefront (1995) and the trilogy comprising One Crazy Summer (2010), P.S. Be Eleven (2013), and Gone Crazy in Alabama (2015), while situating the novels within the tradition of migration texts. Particularly, it examines Williams-Garcia's depiction of the South as home in Like Sisters and the trilogy and analyzes how their respective protagonists, Gayle and Delphine, learn to negotiate southern aspects of their identities by embracing or resisting the South as they move toward defining themselves and growing in personal agency.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1553-1201
Print ISSN
0885-0429
Pages
pp. 307-324
Launched on MUSE
2018-08-16
Open Access
No
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