Abstract

Abstract:

Extensive criticism documents Primo Levi’s life as a survivor and work as a chemist but no serious attention has been paid to his poetry—except in relation to the poems about Auschwitz. As his lyric enterprise moves beyond the Shoah, Levi describes the connection between science and writing and how that liaison led him to a poetic alongside his Jewish roots and inside the European cultural tradition. When he saw in Hiroshima the disturbing interface between the history of war and the history of poetry, he challenged that heritage (as did other modernist poets to whom he might be compared) to find a voice of his own.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1529-1464
Print ISSN
0022-281X
Pages
pp. 43-59
Launched on MUSE
2018-08-15
Open Access
No
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