Abstract

Abstract:

African American families migrated to the Great Plains to stake homestead claims, and in 1904, when the Kinkaid Act offered 640 acres, a group of families established the community of DeWitty in the Nebraska Sandhills. Although located in poor farming country, DeWitty residents built the longest-lasting and largest Black homesteading settlement in Nebraska, and their community featured lively social, educational, and cultural institutions. DeWitty residents, despite a national climate of extreme anti-Black hostility and violence, apparently experienced little racial animus. DeWitty declined during the hard agricultural times of the 1920s and disappeared entirely in the 1930s, but it remains a significant part of Great Plains history.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2333-5092
Print ISSN
0275-7664
Pages
pp. 295-317
Launched on MUSE
2018-08-09
Open Access
No
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