Abstract

Abstract:

This article begins with a single, seemingly isolated moment of activism by the Indigenous residents of the Gap community in Alice Springs. We use this protest to make two arguments. First, we highlight the significance of local mobility to Indigenous people in the twentieth century; and second, we trace a hidden counter network of Indigenous civil rights activism in the Northern Territory. We argue that "micro-mobility" should receive greater attention from historians and show how the 1951 protest was one part of a broader counter network of Indigenous activism, stretching across the vast distances of the Territory.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1532-5768
Launched on MUSE
2018-08-03
Open Access
No
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