Abstract

ABSTRACT:

Naming and shaming is a widely-used strategy to promote human rights globally. Organizations' denouncements of abuses have exerted pressure on states to react, particularly in cases of repression and physical violations. However, evidence of the technique's effectiveness at reducing abuses, varying in type and socio-cultural context, and over time, is lacking. In this article, I explore the technique's limits through an ethnographic case analysis of a naming and shaming campaign in Senegal that succeeded in eliciting a state reaction. Due to incongruence with local human rights efforts, however, it failed to achieve its goal of curbing forced child begging.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1085-794X
Print ISSN
0275-0392
Pages
pp. 605-640
Launched on MUSE
2018-07-20
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.