Abstract

Abstract:

This article examines the founding and early development (1965–1979) of the Spanish family planning movement. This movement was composed of two branches: one medical, the other feminist. Despite their different roots, the two branches had complementary interests. From 1976 to 1979 they cooperated in the dissemination of contraception and sexual education, the establishment and consolidation of private and public family planning centers, and the promotion of a new, more egalitarian (woman) patient-doctor relationship. The movement's final achievement was the legalization of the sale and advertisement of contraception in 1978, followed by the incorporation of family planning into the Spanish public health care system. This article is based on oral history interviews with feminist activists and doctors involved in the Spanish family planning movement, print media from the period, and archival material.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1527-2036
Print ISSN
1042-7961
Pages
pp. 38-62
Launched on MUSE
2018-06-12
Open Access
No
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