Abstract

Abstract:

Historically, Black women have contributed to the foundations of medical research, gynecology, sexuality education, and sexual and reproductive justice, and continue to do so today. However, the intersections of race- and gender-based oppression have repeatedly erased or undermined Black women’s prominence as thought leaders in the field of sex and sexuality. Despite participating in the development of the field since its inception, Black women’s contributions continue to be marginalized. Furthermore, practical benefits of the knowledge that was gleaned from Black women’s bodies (i.e. gynecology and other medical and drug experimentation) have not been equitably disseminated to Black women and girls. Black women sex educators possess a unique set of knowledge and skills that, when centered, has the potential to positively and materially impact the way that sexuality education is practiced.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1547-8424
Print ISSN
1536-6936
Pages
pp. 308-325
Launched on MUSE
2018-06-05
Open Access
No
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