Abstract

ABSTRACT:

This article examines Martha Mosse's work for the Reich Association of Jews in Germany and the reasons why Alice Hirschberg accused her of crimes against humanity after World War II. An awareness of intersectionality in Mosse's and Hirschberg's biographies allows us to interpret their choices within the limitations of existing power structures. Mosse stood out and became an easy scapegoat for Hirschberg due to her intersecting identities as a German-Jewish lesbian woman. Mosse's story is worth examining because it reveals the links between gender, sexuality, homophobia, and accusations of collaboration in the early Federal Republic of Germany.

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Additional Information

ISSN
2164-8646
Print ISSN
0149-7952
Pages
pp. 335-353
Launched on MUSE
2018-05-31
Open Access
No
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