Abstract

Abstract:

Throughout his career Oscar Wilde battled his contemporaries' tendency to look at literary works through the lens of the author. He held that the practice of reading for the author misses the point of why we should turn to literature in the first place, and that it runs into a number of ethical, methodological, and metaphysical problems. Here I reconstruct Wilde's position from his various pronouncements in his essays, reviews, letters, and fiction, and argue that the ideal that emerges of letting the work speak for itself should still be taken seriously by philosophers and scholars of literature.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-329X
Print ISSN
0190-0013
Pages
pp. 49-66
Launched on MUSE
2018-05-19
Open Access
No
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