Abstract

Abstract:

This paper reads James's "The Aspern Papers" as an enactment of the "archival drive," as an "absolute desire for memory" that remembers the past and recreates it by repeating and interpreting it, in an attempt to avoid the threat of closure. James's narrator epitomizes the Derridean notion of "archive fever" in his monomaniacal desire to preserve the eponymous correspondence from the increasingly likely prospect of its burning. Nevertheless, the reduction of Aspern's papers to ashes generates a proliferation of writing coming out of the ashes and invites the formation of a different archive that consists of narrative appropriations and second guessings.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1080-6555
Print ISSN
0273-0340
Pages
pp. 167-177
Launched on MUSE
2018-05-19
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.