Abstract

ABSTRACT:

Using G. M. Trevelyan's Scenes From Italy's War and other first-hand sources, this essay uncovers an impression of the working conditions for VAD nurses and ambulance drivers on the Isonzo Front during World War I. In this way, the significance of many of A Farewell to Arms's oblique aspects—the recent arrival of women at the front, the 1915 cholera outbreak, and the importance of road building—are better understood. Furthermore, I reveal that, in his descriptions of the preparations for the attack at Plava and the retreat from Caporetto, Hemingway's appropriations of Trevelyan are more extensive than previously thought.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1548-4815
Print ISSN
0276-3362
Pages
pp. 25-41
Launched on MUSE
2018-05-22
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.