Abstract

ABSTRACT:

Mina Loy's engagement with dance in her writings exemplifies how a writer can use this corporeal art as a means to articulate a feminist sensibility. In a period when dance was undergoing similar seismic shifts to those transforming the written and visual arts, Loy drew on the expressive kinesthetics of ballet and modern dance to examine the gender politics of the dancing body and explore the performative energies of the written word. This article examines Loy's published and unpublished work—from early poems on Italian futurism to her long poem on the dancer Isadora Duncan—and the dancing that inspired them. It argues that Loy draws on dance to interrogate and experiment with the ways meaning is made with the body and how the body can be part of the meanings of language.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1936-1645
Print ISSN
0732-7730
Pages
pp. 131-156
Launched on MUSE
2018-05-18
Open Access
No
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