Abstract

Abstract:

This article explores the complex relationships between commemoration, history, and financial sponsorship and the resulting representations in our national historical narratives. Upper Canada Village’s Eve of Confederation, written to mark Canada’s sesquicentennial, is ostensibly a love story set in a small town in Confederation-era Ontario. However, a closer look reveals an intricate alliance of stakeholders—governmental, historical, and financial—that influenced the dramaturgy, performance mode, and content of the play. The article examines the play as an example of how the genre of historical performance combined with material conditions that dictate a creative process can appear to subvert, but ultimately reinforce, structures of authority.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1920-941X
Print ISSN
0315-0836
Pages
pp. 38-42
Launched on MUSE
2018-05-17
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.