Abstract

Abstract:

A great deal has been written about how beauty standards historically have placed pressure on women to engage in beauty practices in order to approximate a narrow, racialized, and unachievable beauty standard. This essay adds to that body of literature by engaging in a phenomenological analysis addressing the multiplicity of individuals' embodied experiences, focusing on how women felt as they engaged in a variety of beauty practices. I argue that the sensations and affects associated with these practices played an essential role in expanding historically shifting beauty standards to include a more racially diverse conceptualization and experience of feminine beauty.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1934-1520
Print ISSN
0732-1562
Pages
pp. 167-180
Launched on MUSE
2018-04-25
Open Access
No
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