Abstract

abstract:

Every senior at Haverford College writes a thesis or its equivalent, conducting independent research with guidance from faculty and librarians. Students critically engage in investigative work in archives, field studies, and labs. In this article, librarians explore the way anthropology and history thesis writers do research to define paths toward success. They examine how students use theory, interpret primary sources, and develop arguments. Evidence comes from both students and faculty. Librarians identify challenges for students, including authorial agency and reluctance to question primary sources. This research has led to changes in library instruction and in faculty course planning.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1530-7131
Print ISSN
1531-2542
Pages
pp. 251-264
Launched on MUSE
2018-04-17
Open Access
N
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.