Abstract

ABSTRACT:

Policymakers have largely replaced single-bounded discrete choice valuation by the more statistically efficient repetitive method: double-bounded discrete choice and discrete choice experiments. Repetitive valuation permits classification into rational and irrational preferences: (1) a priori well formed; (2) consistent nonarbitrary values "discovered" through repetition and experience;, (3) consistent but arbitrary values as "shaped" by preceding bid level, and (4) inconsistent and arbitrary values. Policy valuations should demonstrate behaviorally rational preferences. We outline novel methods for testing this in double-bounded discrete choice experiments applied to renewable energy premiums in Chile.

pdf

Additional Information

ISSN
1543-8325
Print ISSN
0023-7639
Pages
pp. 284-301
Launched on MUSE
2018-04-17
Open Access
No
Back To Top

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless.