Abstract

ABSTRACT:

The debate on corporate tax reform in the United States has included arguments for a border-adjustment tax that would effectively raise the tax on imported inputs and provide a subsidy to exports. This policy is equivalent to other uniform border taxes, such as a combined import tariff and export subsidy, and a uniform value-added tax and payroll subsidy. In this paper, I argue that, contrary to popular arguments, such taxes are not neutral in either the short run or the long run, and they have significant consequences for international trade.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1533-4465
Print ISSN
0007-2303
Pages
pp. 433-447
Launched on MUSE
2018-03-30
Open Access
No
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