Abstract

Abstract:

Background: Baltimore is an urban center that has been highly impacted by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV); however, many individuals are unaware of their HIV and/or HCV status. In 2013, the Johns Hopkins Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) developed Generation Tomorrow, an HIV and HCV education, testing, and counseling program with community input and collaboration.

Objectives: The aims of Generation Tomorrow are to increase HIV and HCV awareness and detection in Baltimore and engage the next generation of health professionals (students) and community members (peers) in HIV and HCV outreach services.

Methods: The Generation Tomorrow educational component includes formal HIV and HCV testing and counselling training, and a lecture series for students and peers. The participants then engage in field assignments and outreach events with Johns Hopkins associated programs or community-based organizations.

Results: Generation Tomorrow trained 71 students and peers in three cohorts, 70% of whom reported that they planned to stay in HIV- and/or HCV-related work. From October 2014 to May 2015, which represents the first year that Generation Tomorrow ran with the full academic calendar, Generation Tomorrow students and peers worked with partner organizations to conduct 1,104 HIV rapid antibody tests and found 19 individuals (1.72%) to be HIV positive. Additionally, 778 HCV rapid antibody tests were conducted and 175 individuals (22.5%) were HCV antibody positive.

Conclusions: Generation Tomorrow has been successful in engaging students and community peers in HIV and HCV education, testing, and counseling, and has documented HIV and HCV positivity rates well above general community prevalence.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1557-055X
Print ISSN
1557-0541
Pages
pp. 101-109
Launched on MUSE
2018-03-27
Open Access
No
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