Abstract

Abstract:

Baudelaire's Exposition universelle of 1855 begins by discussing a Chinese object. He does not see it as ugly or grotesque, but as one of many forms of beauty. He thus uses the Chinese object against universal neo-Classical idealism, as part of his argument that "le Beau est toujours bizarre." In the context of his aesthetics more widely, China also stands for both artifice and comedy. These are closely linked since Chinese art provides examples of "le comique absolu" where laughter is provoked by the human sense of superiority to nature. Chinese art thus presents an alternative to the dictates of both neo-classical norms and Nature.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1931-0234
Print ISSN
0014-0767
Pages
pp. 101-113
Launched on MUSE
2018-03-16
Open Access
No
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