Abstract

Abstract:

Caesar's geographies of Gallia and Britannia as set out in the Bellum Gallicum differ in kind, the former being "descriptive" and much indebted to the techniques of Roman land surveying, the latter being "scientific" and informed by the methods of Greek geographers. This difference results from their different contexts: here imperialist, there "cartographic." The geography of Britannia is ultimately part of Caesar's (only passingly and late) attested great cartographic endeavor to measure "the world," the beginning of which coincided with his second British expedition.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1086-3168
Print ISSN
0002-9475
Pages
pp. 93-122
Launched on MUSE
2018-03-08
Open Access
No
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