Abstract

Abstract:

The end of the War of 1812 transformed American political economy. Merchant-financier Jacob Barker participated enthusiastically in this transformation: divesting from war debt after 1814, Barker poured his capital and political experience into banking, insurance, lobbying, and lawmaking. This article makes the case that Barker himself was one of the period's more enduring institutions: though he spent many years in disrepute, his experience and financial logic structured the American state in ways that would endure long into the nineteenth century.

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Additional Information

ISSN
1553-0620
Print ISSN
0275-1275
Pages
pp. 67-76
Launched on MUSE
2018-03-03
Open Access
No
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