Abstract

Abstract:

Between the First and Second World Wars, Heywood Broun (1888–1939) and Benjamin Stolberg (1891–1951) were labor journalists when the newspaper industry was consolidating into chains and industrial unionism was gaining in American society. A comparison of their lives and writings in the 1920s and 1930s illuminates the politics behind news coverage of labor. Suspicious of the Communist Party, Stolberg ultimately clashed with Broun, the quintessential Popular Front left-liberal, over the CIO. The two were similar, however, in framing labor positively, unlike much of the rest of the press, while eschewing any journalistic ethos of "impartiality."

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Additional Information

ISSN
1558-1454
Print ISSN
1547-6715
Pages
pp. 25-51
Launched on MUSE
2018-03-03
Open Access
No
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